Canada Book Award Winner: Brian Metcalfe

Congratulations to Brian Metcalfe, winner of the Canada Book Award for his second novel, The Canadian Consul.

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About the Book

When it comes to human emotions, political opposites do attract.

This is the story of Monique Duhamel who, through the patronage of her father, became the Canadian consul in New York - a fact he’ll never let her forget. Monique has devoted the last five years to her job and her art gallery. But at age fifty, her carefully-laid life has left little time for anything else, including her husband in Toronto. So when Monique encounters an American congressman from the mid-west at a social event, their opposite personalities and political identities spark a mutual attraction that just might shake things up. As she pursues a complex relationship with the congressman, Monique Duhamel will have to figure out what she truly desires, while balancing issues with her career, her distant husband and her ageing father.


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About the Author

Brian Metcalfe is a Torontonian who, as a young man, worked as a deckhand on an oil tanker, as an assembly-line worker in a German steel factory, and as a teacher in Uganda before obtaining a Ph.D. in English Literature. After leaving academia for a career as a chartered accountant, he has returned to fiction, now as an author. His first novel, Coming Home Alone, explored the return to ordinary, small-town Ontario life of a WWII war hero. He lives in Toronto with his wife and has two children and two grandchildren.


The Canada Book Awards program recognizes and promotes Canadian books for their creative achievement and contribution to the world. The award program recognizes the timelessness of a book’s merit whether the book is new or older. Winners are posted on the Canada Book Award website in recognition of their outstanding accomplishment and contribution to the publishing world. Their dedication, expression and passion are an inspiration for all of us.

Canada Book Award Winner: Allan Royal

Congratulations to Allan Royal, winner of the Canada Book Award for his fictional memoir, 736 Dominion Isn’t There Anymore.

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About the Book

Set in the Little Burgundy area of Montreal in the ’40s and ’50s, we follow young Benjamin Flicker’s rather bumpy, often hilarious, and always delightful journey from boyhood to puberty. Through compelling vignettes, Benjamin, the youngest sibling in a large Catholic family, contemplates his world of big brothers, nuns, trusted sidekicks, and the persuasive power of girls.


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About Allan

For over 50 years, Montréal-native Allan Royal has been an actor, writer, theatre director and film producer in the Canadian art world. Paying homage to his humble yet cherished beginnings in Little Burgundy, Allan offers what he knows about the love that shaped him in the giving and taking and weaves this knowledge into a fiction that seems so real you’ll feel it happened to you. This is the first book in a planned trilogy, each focusing on a different stage of Benjamin's life. 736 Dominion Isn't There Anymore is also the basis of Allan's one-man show, The Tales of Benjamin Flicker (2019) that follows the development of his young fictional hero and muse.


The Canada Book Awards program recognizes and promotes Canadian books for their creative achievement and contribution to the world. The award program recognizes the timelessness of a book’s merit whether the book is new or older. Winners are posted on the Canada Book Award website in recognition of their outstanding accomplishment and contribution to the publishing world. Their dedication, expression and passion are an inspiration for all of us.

The Canadian Consul: Book Excerpt

Click either image below to read the first four chapters.


About the Book

When it comes human emotions, political opposites do attract.

This is the story of Monique Duhamel who, through the patronage of her father, became the Canadian consul in New York - a fact he’ll never let her forget. Monique has devoted the last five years to her job and her art gallery. But at age fifty, her carefully-laid life has left little time for anything else, including her husband in Toronto. So when Monique encounters an American congressman from the mid-west at a social event, their opposite personalities and political identities spark a mutual attraction that just might shake things up. As she pursues a complex relationship with the congressman, Monique Duhamel will have to figure out what she truly desires, while balancing issues with her career, her distant husband and her aging father.

IMG_6085.jpg

About the Author

Brian Metcalfe is a Torontonian who, as a young man, worked as a deckhand on an oil tanker, as an assembly-line worker in a German steel factory, and as a teacher in Uganda before obtaining a Ph.D. in English Literature. After leaving academia for a career as a chartered accountant, he has returned to fiction, now as an author. His first novel, Coming Home Alone, explored the return to ordinary, small-town Ontario life of a WWII war hero. He lives in Toronto with his wife and has two children and two grandchildren.

Brian Metcalfe is back with his second novel: The Canadian Consul

When it comes to human emotions, political opposites do attract.

This is the story of Monique Duhamel who, through the patronage of her father, became the Canadian consul in New York - a fact he’ll never let her forget. Monique has devoted the last five years to her job and her art gallery. But at age fifty, her carefully-laid life has left little time for anything else, including her husband in Toronto. So when Monique encounters an American congressman from the mid-west at a social event, their opposite personalities and political identities spark a mutual attraction that just might shake things up. As she pursues a complex relationship with the congressman, Monique Duhamel will have to figure out what she truly desires, while balancing issues with her career, her distant husband and her ageing father.

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Brian Metcalfe is a Torontonian who, as a young man, worked as a deckhand on an oil tanker, as an assembly-line worker in a German steel factory, and as a teacher in Uganda before obtaining a Ph.D. in English Literature. After leaving academia for a career as a chartered accountant, he has returned to fiction, now as an author. His first novel, Coming Home Alone, explored the return to ordinary, small-town Ontario life of a WWII war hero. He lives in Toronto with his wife and has two children and two grandchildren.

Remembering Neil Cole

Neil Cole, whose book God For A Day launched Inglewood Press in 2016, died five years ago today. God For A Day expressed his deep understanding of what unites and what divides us, told as a cosmic fable.

736 Dominion Isn't There Anymore

This is the title of our new book by actor/author Allan Royal. A fictional memoir based on Allan’s own upbringing in the Little Burgundy area of Montreal, it will be published soon. Here, author and publisher are enjoying doing business together.

A wonderful guy to work with and a brilliant new writer!

A wonderful guy to work with and a brilliant new writer!

Ten Things You Didn't Know About Lindsay Fischer

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Lindsay Fischer

Photo by: Samantha Chin

In His Own Words

1) What gets you out of bed every day? 

The dog needs walking and the cats need feeding. I like having simple tasks that you can’t put off.

2) Did you choose your profession in ballet, or did it choose you?

 I chose ballet, I thought, because everyone advised me to do something else.  But the fact that I did it in spite of all advice to the contrary perhaps means that ballet chose me. 

3) As a former principal dancer, where are the most exciting places you’ve ever performed?  

New York State Theater – the house that Balanchine built.  First show on the new stage of the Muziektheater in Amsterdam was pretty neat and guesting on the stage of the Royal Opera House in Covent Garden was also a big deal.

4) What is the greatest thing about your job as Principal Ballet Master/YOU Dance Artistic Director, and the least exciting? 

Watching people discover their talent is very satisfying. But I like everything about the job – I like studying the ballets to be able to rehearse them and planning the process that will get the dancers prepared.

5) What is your favourite way to spend a day off outside of work? 

I like to garden and cook – both things that require you to step back and let things happen, but that give results much faster than teaching ballet. And my two adult children live in Toronto, so my wife and I often go to dinner with them on a free day.

 6) What is the biggest misconception about ballet? 

The biggest misconception about ballet is that you have to understand it.  I think you can understand very little and yet experience things that are beautiful, because you cannot reduce them to previously known quantities.

7) You must get asked this constantly, but what is your favourite ballet, and why?

I know ballets don’t care what I think of them, but I think it would be unfair to choose a favourite nonetheless. Any ballet you can treat as a favourite — that you can treat as though it will reward the physical and emotional effort you put into dancing it, or watching it — is for sure way up on my list.

8) What prompted you to write this series of ballet guides? 

People seem to like the chats before the performances, and every so often, someone would suggest writing them down.  Finally, that someone happened to be Kathleen Metcalfe, who owns a publishing business.  It was kind of hard to make up an excuse not to.  And I like a challenge.  Writing is easy until you have to make sure that someone else understands what you have said to yourself.  Then it becomes quite difficult.

9) What is something you think everyone should do at least once in their lives?

Let a work of art change your opinion of how the world works.

10) If you could, what words of wisdom would you pass on to your younger self?  

Marry Mandy Richardson – right, did that.  Figure out your relationship to your talent, authority, and the impossibility of perfection – working on it.

BONUS: What is something that people are obsessed with, but you just don’t get the point of? 

Twitter.  I can’t prove it, but I suspect that the paucity of discourse in public life has to do with the fact that statements are thought to have more power when expressed in 140 characters.

Lindsay Fischer on Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

Coming February 24, 2019